Welcome to the Gaining Ground Information Database!

A research library intended to be Ground Control for practical and scholarly explorations of innovative land use laws, policies, and practices.

The Land Use Law Center's Gaining Ground Information Database is a free and ever-expanding online database featuring best practice models used by government to control the use of land in the public interest. It includes a collection of federal, state, and local ordinances; commentaries; research papers; research aids; and much more.

Want us to list your program? If you have an exemplary local policy or regulation that you would like us to consider posting on the Database, let us know! Email: landuse@law.pace.edu

Recently Uploaded Resources

20 Jun
Air Quality Liability
Date Added: Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Transportation & Land Use Planning, Healthy Communities, Vulnerable Populations    
New York
Municipal
Buffalo holds not only violators of the ordinances responsible and liable for infringements, but they also hold owners, proprietors, lessors, agents, tenants, managers, superintendents, captains, etc. responsible and liable for any unlawful emission... Read More
20 Jun
Future Development promoting increased Air Quality
Date Added: Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Transportation & Land Use Planning, Healthy Communities, Vulnerable Populations    
Florida
Municipal
To help avoid urban sprawl and reduce automobile use, Nassau created and adopted the East Nassau Community Planning Area (ENCPA) for future land use. The county has certain goals for development within the ENCPA, including: facilitating multi-modal transportation and creating communities that discourage urban sprawl. The goals of development within the ENCPA directly promote public health through encouraging walking and biking, making sure they are safe by planning for them to exist in the future, and decreasing the amount of pollution created .. Read More
20 Jun
Clean Air for Future Generations
Date Added: Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Transportation & Land Use Planning, Healthy Communities, Vulnerable Populations    
Minnesota
Municipal
Chapter 13 of Ramsey, Minnesota’s Comprehensive Plan sets a clear strategy of preserving existing tree canopy and promoting planting more trees in new developments to increase the air quality of the community for future generations. They further set a policy of finding opportunities to plant additional trees along Highway 10 and other major roadways... Read More
20 Jun
Promoting Enhanced Bicycle Infrastructure
Date Added: Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Economic Development, Transit Oriented Development (TOD), Healthy Communities    
Michigan
Municipal
Grand Rapids, Michigan has created legislation to improve existing bike paths and install new bike paths that accommodate recreational trips as well as trips to work, shopping and school. The goal of this legislation is to meet the City’s plan to make 10% of all regional travel made on bicycle. Limiting dependency on cars has manifold benefits: serves those without the capacity to drive (senior and minors); reduces congestion and time spent commuting; reduced land consumption through roadways and parking; tax re-allocation from roadways; improv.. Read More
20 Jun
Energize CT Solar PV Model Zoning Ordinance
Date Added: Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Solar Energy, Zoning    
Connecticut
N/A
Energize CT developed a model solar PV zoning ordinance to aid municipalities in developing their own solar PV zoning ordinance. The model provides example height restrictions for various types of solar collector units. It states that ground-mounted solar PV systems are permitted as an accessory use in all zoning districts upon issuance of the proper permit and that they must not exceed thirty-five inches in height. Roof-mounted solar PV systems (permitted as an accessory use in all zoning districts upon issuance of the proper permit) shall be .. Read More
20 Jun
Grow Solar Local Government Solar Toolkit for Minnesota: Planning, Zoning, and Permitting
Date Added: Wednesday, June 20, 2018
Solar Energy, Zoning    
Minnesota
N/A
The model addresses concerns that are primarily in counties, townships, and rural areas rather than cities and urban areas. The incentive portion of the urban model ordinance can be applied in rural areas, as are provisions addressing solar access and aesthetic considerations in those rural areas with development patterns at an urban scale (typically lots smaller than 1 acre). This ordinance addresses solar energy as both a principal use and as an accessory use to the primary residential or commercial use. The model outlines height restriction.. Read More